Logical Link Cntrol - Connecting to the Upper Layers

Logical Link Cntrol - Connecting to the Upper Layers
Ethernet separates the functions of the Data Link layer into two distinct sublayers: the Logical Link Control (LLC) sublayer and the Media Access Control (MAC) sublayer. The functions described in the OSI model for the Data Link layer are assigned to the LLC and MAC sublayers. The use of these sublayers contributes significantly to compatibility between diverse end devices.

For Ethernet, the IEEE 802.2 standard describes the LLC sublayer functions, and the 802.3 standard describes the MAC sublayer and the Physical layer functions. Logical Link Control handles the communication between the upper layers and the networking software, and the lower layers, typically the hardware. The LLC sublayer takes the network protocol data, which is typically an IPv4 packet, and adds control information to help deliver the packet to the destination node. Layer 2 communicates with the upper layers through LLC.

LLC is implemented in software, and its implementation is independent of the physical equipment. In a computer, the LLC can be considered the driver software for the Network Interface Card (NIC). The NIC driver is a program that interacts directly with the hardware on the NIC to pass the data between the media and the Media Access Control sublayer.

Logical Link Cntrol - Connecting to the Upper Layers
Logical Link Cntrol - Connecting to the Upper Layers
Logical Link Cntrol - Connecting to the Upper Layers
1 comments for "Logical Link Cntrol - Connecting to the Upper Layers"

can i give CCNP direct without CCNA?