Ethernet Collision Management

Ethernet Collision Management

Legacy Ethernet

In 10BASE-T networks, typically the central point of the network segment was a hub. This created a shared media. Because the media is shared, only one station could successfully transmit at a time. This type of connection is described as a half-duplex communication.

As more devices were added to an Ethernet network, the amount of frame collisions increased significantly. During periods of low communications activity, the few collisions that occur are managed by CSMA/CD, with little or no impact on performance. As the number of devices and subsequent data traffic increase, however, the rise in collisions can have a significant impact on the user's experience.

A good analogy is when we leave for work or school early in the morning, the roads are relatively clear and not congested. Later when more cars are on the roads, there can be collisions and traffic slows down.

Current Ethernet

A significant development that enhanced LAN performance was the introduction of switches to replace hubs in Ethernet-based networks. This development closely corresponded with the development of 100BASE-TX Ethernet. Switches can control the flow of data by isolating each port and sending a frame only to its proper destination (if the destination is known), rather than send every frame to every device.

The switch reduces the number of devices receiving each frame, which in turn reduces or minimizes the possibility of collisions. This, and the later introduction of full-duplex communications (having a connection that can carry both transmitted and received signals at the same time), has enabled the development of 1Gbps Ethernet and beyond.

Ethernet Collision Management
Ethernet Collision Management
Ethernet Collision Management
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