Moving to 1Gbps and Beyond

Moving to 1Gbps and Beyond
The applications that cross network links on a daily basis tax even the most robust networks. For example, the increasing use of Voice over IP (VoIP) and multimedia services requires connections that are faster than 100 Mbps Ethernet.

Gigabit Ethernet is used to describe Ethernet implementations that provide bandwidth of 1000 Mbps (1 Gbps) or greater. This capacity has been built on the full-duplex capability and the UTP and fiber-optic media technologies of earlier Ethernet.

The increase in network performance is significant when potential throughput increases from 100 Mbps to 1 Gbps and above.

Upgrading to 1 Gbps Ethernet does not always mean that the existing network infrastructure of cables and switches has to be completely replaced. Some of the equipment and cabling in modern, well-designed and installed networks may be capable of working at the higher speeds with only minimal upgrading. This capability has the benefit of reducing the total cost of ownership of the network.

Ethernet Beyond the LAN
The increased cabling distances enabled by the use of fiber-optic cable in Ethernet-based networks has resulted in a blurring of the distinction between LANs and WANs. Ethernet was initially limited to LAN cable systems within single buildings, and then extended to between buildings. It can now be applied across a city in what is known as a Metropolitan Area Network (MAN).
Moving to 1Gbps and Beyond
Moving to 1Gbps and Beyond
Moving to 1Gbps and Beyond
Moving to 1Gbps and Beyond
Moving to 1Gbps and Beyond
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